Thursday, June 4th, 2015

Thomas Rhett – Crash and Burn

Au contraire, Monsieur Rhett…


[Video][Website]
[7.00]

Maxwell Cavaseno: R&B-flecked Country is increasingly becoming Rhett’s thing, and unlike the excess of “Make Me Wanna,” this one is a bit too slick and hokey, a bit too John Cougar Mellencamp and not enough of the weird Supermarket Sweep of pop he subjects us to when he’s more ambitious. The guy’s obviously just a bag of tricks, but a show works best if you’re focused than more than one at a time.
[6]

Patrick St. Michel: It’s almost too easy for Thomas Rhett to stand out right now — modern country either overdoes the simpler times nostalgia or revels in Red State escape. So, pretty much business as usual, and many of those songs are very good! But the windswept romantics of “Make Me Wanna” still stand out from the pack of singles about drinking in a cornfield. “Crash and Burn” pulls the same trick with a different backdrop, the breeze swapped out for ’50s pop. It’s not quite as catchy (and “All About The Bass”‘ impact remains far too prevalent to really make this memorable) but sticks in your head enough and jumps out.
[6]

Alfred Soto: Two weeks ago its “Chain Gang” quotes “The Way”-indebted hook were cute enough for an [8]. Then I realized it revealed no secrets on repeated play as “Make Me Wanna” did. It still sounds good on the radio, which is where it belongs. 
[7]

Thomas Inskeep: Rhett’s sounding more and more like what I expected from Sam Hunt based on his hype: a country stud soaked in soul. Here he interpolates of all things Sam Cooke’s “Chain Gang,” to great effect, using its “ooh!”s and “ah!”s as percussion, while he charms his way into your passenger seat. I’ll drive him wherever he wants, if he keeps coming on like this.
[8]

Juana Giaimo: I can imagine “Crash and Burn” being part of a karaoke movie scene in which the characters are at a small party, probably in a house and, although only one or two are holding a microphone, they’re all singing, because how can you not sing this? It’s catchy and with a cadence in which each word is separated and easily recognized. They are all happy, with some drinks around, clapping and making silly dance moves, but their voices are joined together to sing a tragic line: “I let another lover crash and burn.” Do they feel guilty? Do you, Thomas? Because I’m so confused about your feelings! It’s not your tears falling down, but those of the one who slammed the door while we all continued to sing carelessly.
[7]

Edward Okulicz: So country genre-fusion has now reached the point where it has to pastiche the ’50s to do something new? Cool. The lyrics are nice and pithy too, flitting between antipathy and regret. Not sure whether the chorus has enough cut-through for the 2010s, but it works pretty well for me.
[7]

Anthony Easton: The drawl is as interesting as the hand claps/whistling, and the buoyant production has this layers of dancing to prevent from crying. I have always found Rhett trying to hard, not quite sorting out what works, or relying on a group of (more) talented friends. This is so sing along tight, so elegant and so smart. It completely works and suggests a significant leap. 
[8]

Reader average: [7.75] (4 votes)

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