Tuesday, December 6th, 2016

Mister Wallace – It Girl

Seems the readers know what we like (thanks, Kevin!)…


[Video][Website]
[7.11]

Thomas Inskeep: Mister Wallace’s debut EP Faggot is one of the fiercest things I’ve heard all year, they can rap as well as anyone out right now, and “It Girl” is the best vogue track of 2016.
[10]

Alfred Soto: Opening with Space Mountain beeps like the ones on early New Order, “It Girl” drops a tick-tock/wristwatch rhyme and something about a magazine before unleashing a breathless horndog monologue. The queer rapper is hungry; they’ll grab your lapels and shout in your face if it’ll get them a deal. Ambition is wasted on the rich.
[7]

Claire Biddles: An almost-perfect push and pull between intimidating personal space invasion and enticing deliciousness. I desperately want to be at this party but I’m probably going to change my outfit three or four times before I leave the house. 
[7]

Ramzi Awn: Mister Wallace has endurance, that’s for sure. And “It Girl” can kiki with the best of them. But the gimmicks are more borrowed than new.   
[5]

Iain Mew: I like their “212”-ish flow and the incredible variety of inflections and uses of the short word “girl,” but the production doesn’t have the invention to match. For me, confrontation repeated to this extent results in more dilution than accumulation.
[5]

Will Adams: The instrumental isn’t far from something I would’ve heard on the Fantasea mixtape, and Mister Wallace’s flow is attention-grabbing, but both they and the music stagnate pretty quickly.
[5]

Ryo Miyauchi: Good luck deciphering through that lightning-fast delivery. Mister Wallace doesn’t make it any easy to pin them down even with lyrics at hand, though that challenge also seems to be the thrill. Like the best rappers warping voice and communication of language, their eccentricities only lure you closer in hopes of understanding them. And “It Girl” is a nice label to fit such a character.
[7]

Brad Shoup: The giddy boasts are fantastic, but I might like the track even better. The synth hits and flashes of fake clavichord conjure suspense scenes in a late-night flick, a shadow-filled space that Mister Wallace fills with manic mischief.
[9]

Tim de Reuse: Wallace’s rapping is disorienting and unpredictable but never messy; they sound enormous and in control, ten steps ahead of the listener at every point, weaving in and out of a gorgeously minimal horror-movie-sting beat and pushing through sci-fi voice modulation that ought to feel corny but instead feels menacing as hell. I am at a loss for words to fully rationalize how infectious this is on every level — in style, in rhythm, in content — and how easy and fun Wallace makes it sound as they pull it off.
[9]

Reader average: [8] (2 votes)

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