Wednesday, December 7th, 2016

Busu – 116 RIP

Via Marcus, a Swedish hip-hop/grunge act, and, uh, NIRVANA??


[Video][Website]
[5.43]

Thomas Inskeep: Dreary hip-hop from Sweden with a faux-grunge guitar backing. This almost — almost — makes G-Eazy sound good.
[2]

Alfred Soto: Essaying the same strummed intensity of Kaleidoscope Dream-era Miguel, “116 RIP” lives or dies by your response to Busu’s quavering singing. Pretending to be amateurish is one thing; being amateurish is another.
[4]

Iain Mew: As this type of sung hip-hop gets increasingly successful it makes sense to take on different singing styles. Busu’s grunge snarl at himself fits the despair of his words, and with not much else to dilute it but the slightest (and beepiest) of hope, “116 RIP” is an uncomfortable but compelling listen.
[6]

Ramzi Awn: Autotune gets in the way of a good riff, and Busu’s voice would be better off without it. The blips and bleeps don’t help much.     
[5]

Anthony Easton: Swedish hip hop sort of sounding like Chicago: spare to the point of a little boring, but matches the ennui. Sort of sounds like Green Day circa 1996, too — which is a combo which you would not think functions well, but is kind of super-appropriate. 
[6]

Megan Harrington: I’ve started watching this Norwegian teen drama called SKAM and I just feel very in touch with what the Scandinavian youth are up to and, like, what they might want to hear at the skate park. And it’s Busu. This is a song for when you get too drunk at a party and you cheat on your girlfriend and you throw up on the stairs and you wake up and smoke a joint and it’s just too fucking quiet, you need some music. “116 RIP” is the song you play. Or, it could be the song they play if such a scene takes place on SKAM
[7]

Madeleine Lee: How can a song so low-key feel so anthemic? It doesn’t even matter that half the lyrics don’t make sense next to each other and that Fanta and rosé sounds dreadful, because I know what it means when he wails “I missed it all / You’re better off without me.” Just like that self-pitying hyperbole, this song makes a big deal out of next to nothing, and it feels good.
[8]

Reader average: [10] (3 votes)

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