Tuesday, May 15th, 2018

Foster the People – Sit Next to Me (Stereotypes Remix)

It’s “Verb the Noun” Day!


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Julian Axelrod: Stereotypes turn an uncharacteristically restrained Foster the People song into an up-tempo disco pop number with shimmering synths and a nimble strut. In other words, they make a Foster the People song.
[6]

Will Adams: It’s strange to have the Stereotypes’ remix being pushed at the same time Foster the People have a new collaboration with The Knocks which, unlike this, isn’t afraid to go full disco.
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Alfred Soto: Hey, if even Maroon 5 could pull a Carly Rae Jepsen-curated version of what millennials call “’80s music,” then so can this rank industry pro who probably wows insiders with karaoke versions of Cameo and Cherrelle. Weightless, allergic to content as if it were gluten, “Sit Next to Me” celebrates the kind of sheen glimpsed when the sun hits the knobs on the mixing board. 
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Nortey Dowuona: Stirring, swirling synths circle the lumpy, poppy bass as the drums leap and spring all around every time it’s time to swing.
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Juana Giaimo: “Sit Next to Me” sounds like contemporary background music: it sounds classy, with a steady beat, low synths and quiet vocals that doesn’t disturb the mood. It would sound good at a mall or at a dinner party — which isn’t necessarily a negative thing, but I’m glad at least Stereotypes added a faster rhythm. 
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Stephen Eisermann: It’s impressive that this song even has the feeling of last call, something it references and centers on. The chorus is groovy and the snaps in the background give the song even more youthful energy, so it’s a shame that this guy sounds like he’s coming on way too strong. It may be all groovy alt-rock in the narrator’s head, but I wonder if maybe the poor girl’s soundtrack to this moment sounds more scared than anything.
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Ian Mathers: The problem with YouTube invariably autoplaying “Pumped Up Kicks” after this one is that it just reminds me of how much more I like these bros when they’re a decent bass riff and some vaguely creepy muttering rather than a slower bass riff and some vaguely horny keening (so, yes, when they were a little less Maroon 5, I admit it). The remix glosses it up a little bit in a decent way, but honestly changes less than I’d expected or hoped. I would literally rather listen to the fifth single from their debut than this again.
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