Thursday, September 19th, 2019

Green Day – Father of All…

Next up, the new single from Green Day… we think?


[Video]
[3.30]

Ian Mathers: If you had played me this blind and said “it’s a band you listened to all the time when you were a teenager”, I have no idea who I would have guessed, but Green Day wouldn’t have made my top ten guesses. It’s like one of those legacy acts that’s had so much turnover they’re unidentifiable, except the original trio is still here and the turnover is just, I guess, aesthetic? And I don’t just mean the vocals, either. It’s not bad – actually, it’s pretty good! – but I can’t seem to prevent part of myself from retreating to a corner and playing Nimrod on repeat.
[7]

Josh Buck: Wait, this isn’t the new Fall Out Boy single? 
[3]

Will Adams: In which Green Day make a triumphant 2019 return by dipping into that sweet, sweet Fitz & The Tantrums money.
[3]

Taylor Alatorre: This sounds like one of those identikit post-punk revival bands from 2005 that would announce their arrival on the scene with a MetroPCS ad placement and a 1.6 review in Pitchfork, all of whose existence I was blissfully unaware of at the time because I was busy listening to “Whatsername” on repeat.
[1]

Juan F. Carruyo: Ostensibly inspired by Prince and with distorted falsettos to show for it, this is Green Day in garage mode; a style they’ve successfully exploited back in 2007 with their Foxboro Hot Tubs side project. The good news: it sounds like they’re having fun again instead of trying to write an updated Tommy. Dig: the bass fills in the second verse and the stronky guitars just after. 
[7]

Josh Love: You could’ve told me this was the first single from some new Jack White-fronted project and I would’ve totally believed you. My own appetite for Green Day was thoroughly sated by the mid-90s, but this song doesn’t even possess a whiff of the personality that somehow made them The Only Band That Matters during Dubya’s reign.
[2]

Katherine St Asaph: Green Day already had a song in Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me. Drumming’s good, needs to be on something that isn’t this.
[4]

Tim de Reuse: This has plenty of raw energy, so why does it feel so tame? Sure, some of the blame lies in the thick layer of 21st-century veneer (Listen! Those claps and their distracting flutter — those snares and their hyperreal DnB punch!) but even if it were stripped of all the studio magic there’d still be no adolescent sneer underneath it all. Keep in mind: the dude who wrote “American Idiot” is saying this new output is “Not political. Surviving in chaos. The real shit.” and the all-purpose lyrics reflect that. Green Day’s MO was never in making essential Political Statements, but they liked to pretend that they did, and that self-satisfied temerity gave them substance that you could, at very least, talk about. This is a level deeper down: music pretending to be music pretending to have a point. Centrist pop-punk, advocating nothing, celebrating nothing; a mild slurry for people who thought Green Day’s previous tunes about not giving a fuck were themselves giving too much of a fuck.
[2]

Jibril Yassin: All these bad riffs and non-sequiturs make me wish Green Day hadn’t abandoned their stupid/ambitious sense of grandeur because this doesn’t scan as interesting, nor fun.
[1]

Kylo Nocom: Even the YouTube commenters are pissed off at how embarrassingly sad this is. Just in case you weren’t sure, Green Day generously included three middle finger emojis next to the line “fingers up” in the description.
[3]

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