Friday, October 4th, 2019

Mura Masa & Clairo – I Don’t Think I Can Do This Again

Don’t let the walls cave in on you…


[Video][Website]
[5.90]

Wayne Weizhen Zhang: Is there a way for this to auto-play in the background anytime someone thinks about contacting their ex?
[8]

Will Adams: As someone who spent most of the first half of this decade lamenting how so many EDM songs built up with an uptempo 4/4 beat only to drop into an energy-sapping half-time hook, this is thrilling. The “Where’s Your Head At” bassline and warbling guitars create the type of nervous dancepop I crave, something like Tomcraft’s “Loneliness” with stakes raised by Clairo’s weary lyric.
[8]

Scott Mildenhall: “Where’s Your Head At” with a more sensitive angst — which is sadly not to say “M.E.”. The clash of styles sets up tension and release without complication, but it’s that calculation that means it falls short of the Jaxx approach of being only gnomic, banging, comical and banging.
[6]

Kylo Nocom: The novelty of juxtaposing campfire singer-songwriter pop with brash electro-fuzz is the song’s one trick, and it’s a trick Mura Masa tries to flesh out with guitar sampling and percussion reminiscent of the more ethereal tracks off George Clanton’s most recent record. Clairo’s performance is quaint, sometimes sounding at odds with the tweeness of the verses, but the hook is where the song finally works. It’s not a temper tantrum, it’s the nauseous resignation after it all finally gets so hopeless.
[6]

Joshua Lu: The transition from acoustic ballad to rock-infused banger is convincingly smooth, but this particular bait-and-switch was much more compelling in the hands of Kero Kero Bonito, who weren’t afraid of a dig into cacophony, and who knew to include an actual bridge. 
[5]

Ian Mathers: I feel like the intro finally sold me on the low-key charms of Clairo in a way her own songs haven’t, but the chorus feels awkwardly accelerated into. It also sounds weirdly like a remix of Basement Jaxx’s “Good Luck” for a second there? Further listens make it less jarring but it still feels like a bit a of a lost opportunity.
[5]

Joshua Minsoo Kim: The chorus is odd: it finds a midpoint between scuzzy electropop and the ruminative tone of Clairo’s typical fare. It neither builds upon the verses’ mood nor feels as cathartic as it should. It’s nice to see both artists branching out, but this feels less fully formed than either of their best songs.
[4]

Michael Hong: That same softness and yearning from Clairo’s Immunity is found across the verses and in the build-up to the chorus, which attempts to cross grungy sludge and futuristic production, but falls slightly short. If you’re going for a hook that’s just the same phrase repeated several times, do something more interesting than distorting it with autotune and dropping it on sludgy bass. The chorus is salvaged only by hints of Clairo popping out from underneath the autotune, giving it much-needed variety.
[6]

Vikram Joseph: The pastoral acoustics and gently endearing clatter of the verses, coupled with a wistful, middle-distance vocal from Clairo, are reminiscent of The Notwist and genuinely quite lovely, as is the fractured outro. I can fully appreciate the instinct to build layers of noise and intensity in between, but the transition into the chorus is painfully jarring and refuses to get any less so on subsequent listens — the low-end synths are far too brash, and the 4/4 club beat feels wildly out of place. It feels like the original and the remix have been spliced into one song — I just want to go back in time, sit down with Mura Masa and rewrite it, because this could have been excellent.
[6]

Joshua Copperman: The title is me @ Clairo discourse. Also me @ anticipating a somewhat underwhelming drop. 
[5]

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