Thursday, December 16th, 2010

AMNESTY WEEK 2K10: Rita Indiana & Los Misterios – El Juidero

It’s our first ever track from the Dominican Republic…



[Video][Myspace]
[7.50]

Chuck Eddy: I like when Rita speeds up and starts sort-of-rapping. The rest is disjointed and frequently over-atmospheric art-song that reminds me of the Colombian band Aterciopelados after they’d sadly outgrown punk, albeit with soulful male singers and an occasional oompah combo overheard from the alley down the street, plus intermittent drum polyrhythms that I wish weren’t so intermittent.
[7]

Martin Skidmore: Weirdly muddy Central American music, possibly merengue, with nicely funky horns that reminded me of New Orleans brass band music when they got going, but it’s all a bit stop-start. There’s an insistent energy in parts, from the beats and vocal as well as the brass, which I wish kept going, but I couldn’t get a handle on the whole thing at all.
[6]

Frank Kogan: The music tenaciously pushes itself through dark foreshortened funk and mystery-movie horns. Briefly, a reggae voice lifts us into the night, freeing us for a moment from the ominous denizens of dusk. Then the pressure returns. I like the setting, but think Rita needs a lot more dance in her voice, even if dance isn’t the goal.
[6]

Alex Macpherson: The handful of Rita Indiana tracks I’ve heard this year are intriguing but frustrating. There’s a ton of interesting stuff happening in here – the odd purée of clattery punk-funk rhythms and traditional Latin carnival feel, the constant left turns in the arrangement – but it’s also pretty elusive music, slipping away from you before you can get a handle on it. Rita Indiana herself isn’t interested in helping puny dilettantes out, sinking laconically into the beats and (awesome) horns – less a dominant character, more another flavour in the brew. I prefer “Los Poderes” – or perhaps it’s just more immediate – but the challenge of trying to pin down “El Juidero” isn’t without enjoyment.
[7]

Alex Ostroff: I am fully convinced that the world of music would be much improved by the following things: (1) more Spanish, (2) more tuba, (3) more punk/merengue/reggaeton fusion, (4) more 6-foot tall Dominican lesbian novelists fronting bands which incorporate all of the above, while making Mexploitation music videos and covering Annie Lennox and Van Morrison by-way-of Patti Smith. Those last two propositions are more recent additions, after having discovered and fallen for Rita Indiana and her utterly batshit insane album. ‘El Juidero’ is the double-time title track that zigs and zags without ever losing the thread: one minute Rita is half-rapping over the top of clattering organic d’n’b, the next she’s plaintively wandering through chromatic scales and blue notes before the tuba takes the reins, leading into a jazz-inflected bass solo. (Apparently, she’s making a movie with Calle 13 next. I wouldn’t expect anything less).
[9]

Jonathan Bogart: I wish I heard as much as there clearly is in the music; but aside from the patch that sounds like an old Arsenio Rodríguez record and the magical “return to Puerto Rico” refrain, it’s mostly sliding off my ear, too modern but not modern enough to witch me fully.
[7]

Andrew Casillas: The easy/lazy description would be to call her “electro meets bachata,” but how would you explain “El Juidero”? This is a track full of funk cadence, salsa rhythms, and frantic punk speed. And if you’re one of the lucky readers out there who can really absorb the horrific depiction of justice within the lyrics, well, bonus points. And to think that this is probably only her 4th or 5th best song.
[9]

Mallory O’Donnell: “El Juidero” is merely the title track opening salvo from Rita & company’s impossibly great and wide-ranging debut effort, one of the best “rock” albums I’ve ever heard. If disco hadn’t had an equivalent best-ever moment in 2010 with “Mena”, this would easily be my album of the year. There’s just a little of the eclectic, playful nature of the whole work in this song (especially that curiously hollow portion in the middle and dripping like quotation marks round the open and close). But this is mainly a straight-up stomper, meant to introduce you to a band you’ll be hearing more from, to let you know a little bit about who they are and where they hail from. I don’t know that I can say much about this song itself, honestly, other than that it’s a little tease of something truly out of this world and if you go no further than it I can only feel sorry for you.
[9]

One Response to “AMNESTY WEEK 2K10: Rita Indiana & Los Misterios – El Juidero”

  1. Aw, I reviewed this but I think I pressed “submit” right after it was taken down. I think I gave it an [8].