Saturday, January 9th, 2021

Miriam Bryant & Yasin – Ge upp igen

Massive on The Swedish Jukebox; middling on ours…


[Video]
[5.14]

Will Adams: Stockholm State of Mind? Perhaps, were it not for the track grinding to a halt with fuzzy filters and ersatz vinyl crackles every thirty seconds. Impressive how Miriam Bryant sounded more impactful in her brief Zedd cameo than she does through the whole of this.
[4]

Jacob Sujin Kuppermann: The constant starts and stops and jarring transitions from the witty, quick verses to the sentimental chorus would kill all of the momentum of “Ge upp igen” if the constituent parts were not so compelling. As it stands, it’s a song only partially lain low by its structural faults; two charming performances doing their best to break free from their stilted environment. Yasin is more successful — he sounds supremely at ease on his verse, and by the time he’s backing up his partner on the bridge you wish that this was his song alone.
[7]

Katherine St Asaph: There are two parts to this song: the part that sounds like “Marvin Gaye” (or, rather, everything “Marvin Gaye” sounds like), and the part with a mild donk on it. Unfortunately, the “Marvin Gaye” part is first, and Bryant keeps bringing it back, to the same effect as John Mulaney queuing “What’s New Pussycat.”
[4]

Thomas Inskeep: I can’t decide if the way “Ge upp igen” slams its rhythmic brakes, repeatedly, going from a slower ’60s-style tempo to a contemporary beat is clever, too jarring, or both. I do know that Bryant sounds like a less-interesting Maren Morris, and Yasin’s rap is just kind of there. This has potentially interesting bones, but hasn’t quite come to fruition.
[5]

Iain Mew: The way it slips in and out of different levels of retro filter is charming, but the effect is highlighted to such an extent that there’s never a chance for a song to develop in between, for better or worse.
[5]

Nortey Dowuona: A loaded guitar swirls alongside Yasin’s plaintive voice, then is chipped by a soft rendition from a distant, long forgotten past which rises, then is flattened by flat-footed drums and sliding bass as Yasin smoothly slides over the snares. Then, the soft rendition rises again, with Miriam gently bonding with it, before leaping over the kick as Yasin croons over the hi-hats. Then the soft rendition begins again with Miriam bonding with it, then it fades from view.
[7]

Austin Nguyen: They may have been “twinning” back in 2016, but, alas, the distance between Alessia Cara and Alicia Keys is not, in fact, short enough to be bridged by a throw-into-limbo tempo change. Bryant & Yasin don’t help their own case that much either: While not completely inert, they both sound distant and indifferent, as if each one were trying to out-Bree Van de Kamp the other in the great contest to obscure emotional investment while blood stains the piano keys and jewelry is eaten.
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