Monday, February 22nd, 2021

Dua Lipa – We’re Good

We begin the week with Aaron’s curse for these times…


[Video][Website]
[4.31]

Aaron Bergstrom: From Ted Cruz to Dua herself, I want every brazen COVID vacation to feel exactly like this song: You thought it was going to be a fun little burst of tropical sunshine, but it turns out to be boring and pointless and weirdly depressing and you can’t quite figure out why.
[2]

Vikram Joseph: You kind of have to laugh at Dua Lipa responding to criticism about her various mid-pandemic getaways by releasing a tropical island jam. In fairness, it’s thoughtful of her to bring something back for us — “We’re Good” is a quirky, disorientating little blast of winter sun, which would have sounded jarring on the Future Nostalgia tracklist but which sounds pretty good in its own right. It’s an easy song to pick at — the intro echoes Lana Del Rey’s “Doin’ Time” cover, the chorus vocal melody is remarkably similar (one presumes unintentionally) to that of a Magnetic Fields song, and “we’re not meant to be like sleeping and cocaine” is a metaphor that makes less sense the more you think about it. But, rather like waking up to watch the England cricket team play under a warm subcontinental sun — one of the little things that has got me through this winter lockdown — the primary appeal of “We’re Good” is that it feels like something beamed in from another timeline, so I guess we should just be grateful to our globetrotting protagonist for that.
[7]

Austin Nguyen: Tropical Lipa strikes again — this time, for a placid bossa nova kiss off that, of all drugs to reference, believes “sleeping and cocaine” would be the best pair of words to encapsulate relationship dissonance (when, in the proper doses, they might actually be fine together?). Also here for round two: the friends-by-association, but still unnecessary Vocal Quirk Lipa (gratefully sparse and saved for last), with all her belts and cracks that don’t add nearly as much drama as she thinks to a chorus that feels more like a build-up to the arrival point rather than the event itself. The sunglasses are on, the windows down, but we’re meh at most.
[5]

Andrew Karpan: Lipa’s line of refried-Madonna anthems were a curious balm at the pandemic’s start. The tunes were digitized fossils of a misremembered past, often literally so, but they were also coming from a time before the beginning of the ongoing mass death event, when the dates of missed concerts would pass by with a fearful, confusing lull. But after too many listens, the woozy synths on “Levitating” sounded more and more like ambulance sirens and by the year’s end, the record was a safely forgotten artifact of the 2020 that was planned, that could have been and that your insurer will not cover. By the time Lipa salvages this wonky take on a “thank u, next”-type song from the cutting room floor of that last shot at mass communication, its clunky weight is almost unbearable, a spiel of nonsense words whose most interesting milestone is a confusing metaphor involving the impact of cocaine on sleep. (Reports the Daily Mirror: “The New Rules hitmaker has never spoken about drugs before.”) In the song, she sings about the liberation of being able to leave someone without making a very big deal about it, of the joviality of feeling nothing. Ah, but I feel too much. 
[3]

Lauren Gilbert: Why is this a single when “If It Ain’t Me” exists?
[5]

Thomas Inskeep: Why is Dua Lipa singing a sludgy mid-tempo song? We want uptempo faux-disco from you, Dua, not this bowlful of mealy-mouthed meh. Her worst single by furlongs.
[2]

Scott Mildenhall: Is it temerity, complacency or obliviousness that has led to this dead horse of a song about not flogging a dead horse being flogged? Its patchwork of ideas — mostly good, entirely elevated by the chorus — is almost as clumsily contrived as its most attention-grabbing lyric. It being a year on, the new edition should have just been called Nostalgia; if you really want to feel this moment, end it like you should.
[6]

Alfred Soto: Squeaking over strummed parts, Dua Lipa can’t awaken this melodic nullity, released only because she’s a star and yet would have got her nowhere as a first single.
[3]

Wayne Weizhen Zhang: In the early days of the pandemic, especially because Dua Lipa was one of the first stars to release her album during lockdown, the brightness and vim of Future Nostalgia‘s disco landscape felt like the freshest, most exciting possible take on pop. It’s been a little under a year since the album’s initial release and — to put it lightly — things have changed. Between “Don’t Start Now,” “Physical,” “Break My Heart,” “Hallucinate,” “Levitating,” “Levitating ft. DaBaby,” “Levitating (The Blessed Madonna Remix),” “Un Dia (One Day),” “Fever,” “Prisoner,” and “Future Nostalgia” itself (which was a promotional single), I can’t help but feel a little exhausted before even listening to “We’re Good.” (And that’s saying something: I ordinarily love when pop stars re-release albums to sneak on more singles.) The song itself doesn’t do much to combat my feelings before even listening to it; it’s serviceable and certainly not bad, but probably the weakest of all of the singles associated with the Future Nostalgia: The Moonlight Edition. Dua, darling, you’ve performed marvelously throughout this whole album cycle, and brought so many people so much joy. Now is time to let a good thing end before it starts to rot. 
[5]

John Seroff: “We’re Good”s lyrics point the way towards solo recovery from a relationship that’s run its course but its Titanic-by-way-of-Lanthimos video reads to me as sly commentary by Lipa and her team about the callous nature of pop consumption habits and her unwillingness to be so quickly digested. Fair play; along with the superior “Fever,” “Good” is definitely among the stronger bonus tracks on her revamped Future Nostalgia LP, all tripping scansion over trap-trop production. Unfortunately it pales next to the rest of the leaner and far superior original’s playlist, and sounds all the more mediocre in comparison.
[6]

Edward Okulicz: While I was as onboard the “omg Future Nostalgia is amazing, I love you Dua Lipa” train as anyone, I wouldn’t even lift another single off it to put this out as a B-side, let alone re-release the album. There’s no effortless sleekness here, and the chorus is an awkward mess of syllables you can’t lose yourself in. Part of it reminds of of “Blur” by Britney Spears, too, but I’d not stretch to “good” at any point.
[4]

Will Adams: Dua, “That Kind of Woman” was right. There. Snark aside, “We’re Good” understandably attempts to expand the Future Nostalgia world outside of the ersatz disco-pop that by the end of 2020 had started to wear thin. i just don’t know if the way to approach that was by emulating “Harleys In Hawaii.”
[4]

Katherine St Asaph: The least interesting major pop star in a decade continues to exist.
[4]

Reader average: [8] (2 votes)

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3 Responses to “Dua Lipa – We’re Good”

  1. The only nostalgia this provides is for an era before Dua had a true identity. Not sure that relates to as many people.

  2. KATHERINE LMAAAOOOOO *duas existence intensifies*

  3. actually tho … anyone else feel like someone told her once, long ago, in a bar, in an off handed way, “You kinda sound like Rihanna here!” and she just Embodied it a little too hard?

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