Tuesday, July 19th, 2011

Death Grips – Guillotine

YUH!


[Video][Website]
[6.50]

Katherine St Asaph: I guess the success of Sweeney Todd and the success of Trent Reznor’s Oscar-winning film and the, um, existence of Repo! means the path is clear for a grind-opera about the French Revolution. Death Grips does the soundtrack. They’ve got the anguished shouting down, the high-pitched wheedles for when the blades fall and a few unintrusive bloops, because this is a techno-fancy remake where Robespierre gets a computer chip up his forehead. Goodness knows how they managed Odd Future for creative/aesthetic advisers. After Tyler, the deluge.
[6]

Hazel Robinson: I was expecting hardcore from the name, so was surprised to find Odd Future but at the same time, suddenly blindsided by the fact they’re mining the same vein. I had been thinking about Tyler along the same lines as teenage Emperor but no, Ollie Sykes. This, though, I do like — it’s ugly and it’s woozy and it’s clubby and it’s got stupid wibbly computer game noises and the operative line is itgoesitgoesitgoesitgoesitgoesguilloTEEEEEEN-YAH! Party at the cupcake store.
[8]

Brad Shoup: If it’s gleefully obnoxious, you’ve gotten me halfway there, which is why the Crucifucks’ first album is the greatest record ever made. And this is some antagonizing shit, sort of the ballgrabbing yin to Sleigh Bells’ yang. Bone-bruise synth blobs eventually concede to awful, trebly squeaks, and all the while, an anonymous MC emotes like the bastard child of Gravediggaz and Divine Styler. The mixtape’s great, too.
[8]

Michaela Drapes: Intensely unpleasant, for a good reason. Death Grips’ PTSD rhymes lob a Molotov cocktail at Tyler the Creator’s quarter-life crises and and Waka Flocka Flame’s first-person shooter blather. I’m not sure many people much care about the connection between street violence and acts of war; Death Grips, on the other hand, shoves your face in it with the shrieking guillotine chops that punctuate each verse.
[7]

Jonathan Bogart: Indie hip-hop crew whose omnidirectional aggression and free-floating anger are fare more authoritative and believable than, oh gosh this reference, Odd Future’s. Maybe it’s just the grinding, dissonant production and my own headspace, but they sound more familiar with the actual hard choices and long-term disillusionment of adulthood than any rappers I’ve heard in ages, save maybe Killer Mike. And that spectrum — somewhere between OFWGKTA and Killa Kill — is not a bad place for a debut to land.
[7]

Jonathan Bradley: This exhibits with bass all the facility Slipknot had with distortion, that is, a large amount that results in terribly little of worth. “Serial number, killing machine!” Hope it’s not too hard to rap through that gimp mask.
[5]

Josh Langhoff: If there’s room among acceptable entertainments for CSI or “Psycho killer, qu’est-ce que c’est”, there’s gotta be room for MC Ride’s bag and bucket of disintegrating trick parts, especially if said parts symbolize the members of Odd Future. So I see no reason to get angry at this song, but it’s not doing much for me, either. If it came on the radio while I was driving on an abandoned dirt road at night, I might be spellbound, but it’s hard to freak out in the controlled and sanitary environs of iTunes and YouTube. Cool sound FX and good enthusiasm, though.
[5]

Pete Baran: It is possible that this track is musically constructed exclusively from sounds from Transformers 3: Dark Of The Moon. There is much industrial bass weirdness, revving, but thankfully nothing that sounds like Shia LaBeouf. Its a dark and murky bit of undie hip-hop, and all the better for that. It would not be praising it (or indeed some dog mess found on a street corner) to say that it is better than anything in Transformers 3. But if Michael Bay made undie hip-hop, he would dream of making something like this.
[6]

One Response to “Death Grips – Guillotine”

  1. This is awesome, and I may never listen to it again.