Tuesday, July 26th, 2011

David Guetta ft. Taio Cruz & Ludacris – Little Bad Girl

Couldn’t find him with Taio, so here he is with one of his favourite brands brands brands…


[Video][Website]
[3.38]

Hazel Robinson: This sounds like will.i.am writing a parody. Imagine will.i.am writing a parody — it beggars belief, does it not? So does Taio Cruz (someone I was totally pro five years ago) continuing his reign of misogynist pop terror; “little bad girl” makes my skin crawl said once but again and again and again with a hammering beat until eventually the message that Taio’s seen a lady “dancing over thurr” and “when [she] moves [he] wants more” and this is what constitutes a “little bad girl.” The key difference between this and say, Enrique’s recent Dirty Dancer is that that song focused on exactly why and how the lady was a dirty dancer, whereas this is just some old drunk dude heckling in a sticky-floored bar. What the fuck Ludracris is bothering to turn up to this for I have no idea. There is a great walking 8-bit synth line that is utterly wasted on this mess, too, which is where it picks the lone point up from.
[1]

Ian Mathers: I’m pretty sure I played the first minute or so of this on my Sega Genesis back in the day. Which actually means that it’s more musically compelling than most of Guetta’s recent output, but the whole song is pretty much as empty (as distinct from shallow) as anything else Guetta puts his hand to. Ludacris is always a welcome presence, but Taio Cruz continues his slide into complete nullity. (Am I the only one that remembers “Moving On”?) Really, the biggest impression that this track makes is just that, if all we ever hear about this woman is that she’s amazing on the dance floor, what makes her such a bad girl?
[3]

Michaela Drapes: Good lord, moving one’s ass to the left and then to the right are all the qualifications it takes to be considered a “bad girl” on the dancefloor these days? How bleak. One point for Luda’s gratuitous guest spot, and one for that surely-ripped-from-Daft-Punk guitar riff.
[2]

Jake Cleland: This song sounds a little bit like a lot of things, but that’s its strength. I’ve heard that the best songs for a DJ to play are ones which everyone kinda knows but not enough to be tired of, and I suspect that vague familiarity will lead to many a sticky floorboard torn up to this song before the end of the season. The video is incredible; David Guetta’s self-mythologizing is way more exciting when he isn’t just standing awkwardly behind Kid Cudi in a cramped elevator. Ludacris is wildly inconsistent and the way he throws in his name mid-line is almost as superfluous as Taio Cruz rhyming “urr” with “thurr,” but not nearly as criminal. Chingy should’ve taken that to his grave.
[5]

Katherine St Asaph: David Guetta’s crossover singles alternate between template 1, the one that sounds like an unsubtle RedOne (think on that) and model 2, the one that sounds like “I Gotta Feeling.” This is template 1; “Where Them Girls At” is template 2. “Who’s That Chick” was template one, and too many predecessors to list were template 2, occasionally broken up by something fun that makes Guetta’s discography a rondo. This means I don’t have to review “Little Bad Girl”; just go find my other David Guetta reviews and extrapolate. Points do go to the Ludacris verse, which is its own template but rarely sounds this much like he’s bungee-jumping into a trampoline pit.
[5]

Brad Shoup: What can I say? The guy’s a pro. There’s a hair’s breadth between oppressive and merely intense, and this falls cleanly on what I consider the right side. The chorus is fantastic exhortation, and even Luda’s standard-issue verse gets a polish (“DRAWP”). Seems like Cruz and ‘Cris are talking about two different clubs, but ‘s OK, the track’s appropriately blowed.
[8]

Martin Skidmore: I’m tired of his stomping electrohouse, and kind of need something special on top to make it palatable. Taio isn’t it: his mostly harshly autotuned and cliched paean to the girl is dreary and marginally distasteful. My favourite guest rapper ever, Luda, adds some gonzo energy and a touch of wit, and if it were all him I expect I would really like this, but the rest is far too lumpen in lyric, delivery and music to appeal.
[4]

Renato Pagnani: Cruz and Guetta’s shared facelessness cancel each other out, leaving nothing but a void in their absence, one that threatens to pull everything within its orbit onto the most boring dance floor in existence. The only thing that has actual mass is the beginning of Luda’s verse, which happens to be the nimblest Ludaflow in a long while. It sounds like he’s red-lining his engine in an attempt to escape the track’s gravitation field, but even he loses steam half-way through, realizing that Ludacris circa 2010 just doesn’t have the juice to outrun this black hole.
[3]

Alfred Soto: The girls look at Taio and “act coy”? Maybe they heard him mispronounce “air” in Christian Bale’s Batman voice against the producer’s Eurogeneric backdrop, the latter of which renders Luda’s motormouthing into a genial splat. 
[1]

Jer Fairall: There are plenty of reasons why I wish David Guetta would just go away, but high up there is just how difficult it is becoming to keep throwing criticisms at him.  This certainly isn’t meant to imply that his music is getting even incrementally better, or that my resistance to it is lowering even a little bit, but rather that it is all so consistently flavourless and lacking in nuance that writing about it is like being asked to review a rice cake.  Small consolation, I guess, that this doesn’t even have one of his usual big, annoying hooks that tend to raise his songs to the level of public nuisance rather than petty irritant, but that still doesn’t mean I’m not already cringing at the prospect of having to hear this every time I leave my house over the next four months.  
[2]

Jonathan Bogart: I’m not a Guetta-hater on principle, but it turns out I only like him when he’s working with distinctive female voices. Taio “Anonymity” Cruz and Luda “Paycheck” Cris are, at least on this song, neither.
[4]

Andy Hutchins: Rare is the song about the club that makes no sense to me, but this is one: Guetta’s progression is more Benassi-ish than Guetta’d, and there’s a weird Nintendo feel to the one low synth in the verses, which is not a thing I associate with Guetta; Taio decides to remedy his unfortunate lack of any interesting characteristics whatsoever by imitating will.i.am; Luda’s verse is arrhythmic and needlessly wordy and packs all the worst things he does into eight bars, plus “GOO-etta.” At least it’s good to know Vitamin Water’s product placement game is forever on point.
[2]

Chuck Eddy: I kinda feel like a party-pooping spoilsport for having no use whatsoever for hits like this (all three zillion of them) — Like it’s obviously the 2011 equivalent of hating disco in 1978. The main difference is, disco was actually good. Graded leniently because, like any number of great disco records, it seems to concern a dancing queen.
[4]

3 Responses to “David Guetta ft. Taio Cruz & Ludacris – Little Bad Girl”

  1. Bummer.

  2. I hope that Ludacris would be outraged that his verse is taken as the point where the video-makers throw in the clunking product placement for Vitamin Water.

  3. I still love this so much.