Wednesday, November 20th, 2013

Mojito Lite – Si Te Molesta

I’m curious now about the implied possibility of a Mojito Heavy…


[Video][Website]
[4.89]

Iain Mew: The brass is rich and triumphant, and I love the times when the drums stop so that the brass can act as an exclamation point at the end of each line. The combination with the country-rock feel of the vocals and guitar works out well, and it’s the song this week which most makes me wish that I spoke the language they’re singing to get more from it.
[6]

Daniel Montesinos-Donaghy: The whiteboard in the Mojito Lite office reads: “horns’n’geetarss”, “mid-tempo”, “lighters up”. Maybe these scribblings will turn into a real great song!
[4]

Alfred Soto: The trumpet is a bit much with a vocal this emphatic and a guitar solo this elegant.
[5]

Rebecca A. Gowns: This is not the time to live up to your band name! E.g., my mom would order this on a Thursday night!
[5]

Patrick St. Michel: It’s an easygoing ballad that puts the “lite” in the band name, but they stir things up with those persistent horns and the lead singer’s strong delivery come the chorus.
[5]

Jonathan Bogart: The song only comes together with any force on the title line “si te molesta/allí esta la puerta” (if that bothers you/there’s the door) (“that” being the fact that our girl won’t be controlled or put down by any man). The brass has what non-Latin listeners would call a mariachi timbre, but the actual charts are much closer to Baroque fanfares (which makes sense; they’re Colombian, not Mexican), and the rest of the production’s chugging rock merely plods. Despite the grit in her voice, Laura Mayolo isn’t a distinctive enough singer to overcome her bandmates’ unimaginative playing, and their overall combination of vaguely Latin sounds and boring rock hasn’t been remotely remarkable since the late 1980s.
[5]

Mallory O’Donnell: Rather Eurovision, abetting my long-standing argument that there should either be a Latin American equivalent or some kind of unholy fusion of the ESC with the rest of the big stage song-making world. Stadium antics, an endless chorus, it’s monumental but ultimately a bit forgettable. 8 points from Moldova.
[5]

Will Adams: Well, it was fun for a little bit to pretend that it was early Alanis singing in Spanish. But I can’t find much else to enjoy in this standard rock track with brass awkwardly grafted on top.
[4]

Brad Shoup: You wonder why American country, when it tries to summon a neighborly flavor, usually comes up with just a couple trumpets. “Si Te Molesta” isn’t a ranchera; it’s a pop/rock tune. But it lets the brass drip all over itself, like a melting polycarbonate. Laura Mayolo plants well, but is too breathy. The additional vox shouldn’t have been necessary.
[5]

Reader average: [5] (1 vote)

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