Wednesday, February 26th, 2014

Cash Cash ft. Bebe Rexha – Take Me Home

Not a cover of a Spice Girls B-side


[Video][Website]
[4.50]
Daniel Montesinos-Donaghy: That chorus! Those pounding, incessant knocks toward a traditional rave-up! Impassioned vocal performance from a pop-punk protege combining chaste romantic angst with a sexually suggestive hook! This is exactly the same song as Zedd’s “Stay the Night”!
[4]

Will Adams: One of EDM-pop’s most invigorating build-ups in recent memory — indelible, scream-along hook! giant toms! 8-bit sweeps! — wasted on a singer imitating Neon Hitch and a drop imitating all other drops.
[6]

Crystal Leww: EDM-pop is on the decline, with Avicii all but throwing in the towel and adopting EDM-country/folk, but Cash Cash and Bebe Rexha show that there’s nothing like something dumb and obvious to suck y’all right back in.
[6]

Anthony Easton: Though this is overwhelming, loud and big, it’s not dumb enough or trashy enough to be pure pleasure and not ambitious enough to be interesting.
[4]

Alfred Soto: It’s got a chorus that uses every stuttering EDM effect to predictable ends, with boilerplate title sentiment the cherry on top. The verses suggest a promising Chvrches-Saint Etienne collaboration.
[3]

Scott Mildenhall: So that’s where Cher Lloyd got to! There’s a cartoonishness about this not really present in charting dance music right now, or even really charting pop – it sounds every bit like it should have a video like the similar “Fly On The Wings Of Love” did, or what Studio Killers could do if they were more into drops than choruses. The lyrics make for some nice concrete poetry too.
[6]

Andy Hutchins: The 2014 version of “Clarity,” and a troubling sign. This is for all the young women — self-identifying as girls still, surely; watching Girls, clearly — in the club on a Thursday and rationalizing dealing with some of those dudes Nicki was shooting at, the same ones who probably nod in recognition to “Last Night.” There’s something in Rexha’s feline vocals, the ones she gets to purr in the verses, and the second verse is interestingly written; the rest is palliative care administered twice an hour or once an evening. Would that women dating the wrong dudes was not a demo.
[3]

Katherine St Asaph: In 2011 (ages, in pop years), I wrote about how girl pop trended troubled while boy pop trended predatory. Then pop imploded; 2013 was supposed to be like 2011, with albums by all the big pop stars scheduled to shine again after a year of Carly Rae and Gotye and other protostars, then the protostars took it again. But in those outer orbits, the gender war continues, stronger if anything. The boys remain boys, whether playfully dangerous or dangerous-dangerous; and with a few exceptions specifically marketed as exceptions (Lorde, mostly) the girls threw themselves harder at their most pained feelings, whether via Lana Del Rey reveries or ecstatic dramatics like “Clarity” and now this. Bebe Rexha is the Foxes of the track, having escaped dealing with Pete Wentz for the songwriter-gone-solo circuit. Her voice is craw-y and splayed in that way that signifies vulnerability, and her story’s a resigned rush: earnest verses and exuberant runs thrown at an EDM track that only cares about her as a conduit to get that cash cash, and attention thrown at a boy even she admits is probably just glad she’s desperate. Specifically, I can’t help but hear “Take Me Home” as the flipside to “Hold On, We’re Going Home”: the moment of being played, the sort of forthrightness certain dudes take as loud female feelings they can pretend to soothe all the way back to their place. She’s aware, but decides to give in, exclaims “take me home!” like she’s got the guy and won the night, slot-machine jackpot synths cheer her into the winners’ boudoir, and the song ends happy — until what? (I’m not reading anything into this. It’s all there in the lyrics.) The story’s not necessarily gendered — this is basically Maroon 5’s “One More Night” with the roles flipped — and there’s nothing wrong about relating to it. Lots of people do. (I might have, in the past; this discussion comes to mind.) But the story feels distinctly female, in a marketable and uncomfortable way. Is it too Reviving Ophelia to dislike that? Or is it just that this strain of EDM is inherently unlikable?
[3]

Brad Shoup: When her gargling threatens to shoot into the sky, that’s the best part. It’s a damn cri de coeur, even if Cash Cash cooked up a game-show chord progression.
[6]

Patrick St. Michel: Take me somewhere that doesn’t sound like every other Avicii-loving club.
[4]

Reader average: [3] (2 votes)

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One Response to “Cash Cash ft. Bebe Rexha – Take Me Home”

  1. Katherine, that apocalypse pop post was the first thing of yours I ever read. That was a case of insta-follow if ever there was one.