Friday, March 7th, 2014

Phantogram – Fall in Love

You know it’s average when we play Spot The Influence…


[Video][Website]
[5.71]

Patrick St. Michel: The instrumental to this is probably fantastic, but the lead vocals just clog this up way too much.
[5]

Alfred Soto: Cute Speak ‘n’ Spell synth bleeps, but the vocal has the blank emotionalism that Ghostface is dying to sample.
[4]

Iain Mew: Fuzzy collages of strings and cut up electronics make for a great sound but can feel a bit of a cheap route to warmth and beauty. That’s why it comes with an extra jolt when Phantogram use theirs as a rug that always feels about to be pulled away even before it is. “Falling” is a word that pop loves, but it’s rare for the physical meaning of it to come forward so strongly.
[8]

Mallory O’Donnell: It’s not a bad idea at all, this sort of fancy electro-pop bar-room lady-and-her-beats thing, but it wants much less throb and far more gristle. Until then it’s nice with benefits, but I ain’t gonna fall in love.
[6]

Megan Harrington: Phantogram sound like Beach House but with synthesizers in place of the reverb. But all the glitchy electronics in the world won’t lure this song out of bed on Sunday morning. Truthfully, neither band needs more atmospherics; when you pull back the linens and blankets and duvet, “Fall In Love” is a slight skeleton. 
[5]

Scott Mildenhall: Such mystery is usually bottomless. Phantogram might know what’s going on in their lyrics, but for all that they’re clear, they might as well not do. Intrigue is always good though, and with a basic idea there, there’s a good starting point: Sarah Barthel seeming to almost revel in her relationship’s toxicity, before unravelling to suggest the wooziness is as much in her head as the situation. “Frontier Psychiatrist” stripped of its overload of ham – inadvertently accruing more ham with a base deadly seriousness – is still good.
[7]

Brad Shoup: Wow, someone misses Kanye Klassic. There’s barely any room for feels, hardly any for groove, just trip-hop runoff that bypasses the two-chord groove set up by the intro. This sounds as big as the biggest missed opportunity.
[5]

Reader average: [9] (4 votes)

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