Tuesday, July 14th, 2015

Wolf Alice – Bros

Despite the name, this is not a member of Animal Collective and not a Panda Bear cover…


[Video][Website]
[6.73]

Iain Mew: On their album, Wolf Alice tour around a lot of different indie rock sub-genres, and what’s impressive is not just their adaptability but how naturally they match their songs to that variety. So with “Bros” where they give fuzzy nostalgia an equally fuzzy shoegaze treatment, its echoed guitar doing the atmospheric work to make its neatly sketched lyrics of haircuts and wild days speak louder and more longingly.
[8]

Thomas Inskeep: Tuneful UK indie-rock of the ilk that would’ve gotten ’em plastered all over the weeklies, back when the weeklies were still a thing. Now it just gets ’em an NME cover and a #2 album, and likely a nice write-up in Q and/or Mojo.
[5]

Rebecca A. Gowns: There are posters of Wolf Alice’s NME cover plastered all over my neighborhood (Hollywood), and without hearing them, I would have assumed it was some kind of Hole-esque grunge revival thing. This song pleasantly subverts all my expectations — it is not at all evocative of “bros,” “wolf,” or “Alice [in Wonderland],” and that’s a good thing. If we’re talking throwbacks, it’s more in the vein of The Cranberries: melodic indie rock with an ethereal female lead. It veers slightly more towards the commercial end of the spectrum, but that’s not a bad thing; if this were to pop up on a Jeep ad, I wouldn’t skip it. It’s ripe for replays.
[7]

Will Adams: Shares the gossamer quality of Silversun Pickups’ “Lazy Eye,” but with an extra layer of ’90s sepia tone to make it all the more dreamy.
[8]

Alfred Soto: Behold, the crystalline seas of early Cranberries and The Ocean Blue, with beats and tribal hooks borrowed from The Knife. It’s pretty — college stations will love it.
[6]

Katherine St Asaph: Surprising no one, I prefer nostalgia for mid-’90s college rock to nostalgia for mid-’00s indie rock. Which means the parts of this I like are the parts that remind me of the Cranberries.
[6]

Ramzi Awn: Belly, The Lemonheads, and Cocteau Twins don’t make for a bad mix, and the nod to Blue Valentine doesn’t fall on deaf ears. Wolf Alice knows a thing or two about grunge, and it shows.
[7]

Maxwell Cavaseno: Wish this song had a chorus as memorable as that strange gurgling take on this Jimmy Eats World/Foo Fighters style strummer groove intro.
[5]

Brad Shoup: Nice to hear something that shivers in the summer. Everything seems to take its cue from the drums, a rubbery flap that reveals itself, at half-speed, to be a Cranberries song. Even the best relationships come with the worry that you’re never completely known, that there’s some part of you that even the hardiest soul won’t try to uncover. And so it is here, buried toward the end, dropped between the standard signifiers of wildness and adolescent stealth.
[7]

Danilo Bortoli: There’s a major difference between youthfulness and joviality. The youthful person, which, by now, has been elevated to the status of a stereotype, represents a stage in one’s lifetime — we’re supposed to grow out of childhood and learn something in the process. Joviality is the result of this process — something that sticks to central aspects of your childhood and never quite goes away. I don’t think it can be learnt, really. Wolf Alice, in all of their impeccable, carefully constructed music, reminds of this separating factors between youthfulness and joviality. Ellie Rowsell is not a child anymore, I bet, but she sings about about growing up and finding friends with the confidence and authenticity of someone who has been there, done that. And this is not a matter of merely pursuing youth — mainly the myth — because youth is a fugacious ideal. Joviality, on the hards, requires a sense of fleeting grace. “Bros” is that: a finely executed song not just about being young, but also about keeping that little sparkle of joviality (the excitement) alight. In the bridge, she asks, “Are you wild like me?” There is no way she could’ve come up with a better ode to just being alive.
[8]

Scott Mildenhall: A hurtling voyage to nowhere in particular, made with no stress whatsoever. Ellie Rowsell’s words and voice are reassuring and warm, under no pressure and placing none on the song. It doesn’t sound wistful for youth, but rather still there, in the moment and between friends. “Bros” would be easy to attach that forlorn yearning to from a personal standpoint, but in itself contains no sadness. Instead, it is quietly ebullient.
[7]

Reader average: [7] (2 votes)

Vote: 0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10

3 Responses to “Wolf Alice – Bros”

  1. Putting the (Luke/Matt) Goss into gossamer

  2. The original version of Bros is great too:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nKXbUkVAHiM

  3. BIG BOWL OF CRANBERRIES