Friday, July 30th, 2010

Selena Gomez and the Scene – Round and Round

“I just noogied my boyfriend…”



[Video][Website]
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Frank Kogan: She dons an int’l spycoat and they give her an int’l briefcase, but the plot is muddy and her voice is muffled. I hope this isn’t Selena’s idea of stylishness.
[4]

Anthony Easton: Glamorous casting of Gomez as a spy in the house of love, can’t quite be sure that it’s about the paparazzi, but love how the work keeps pushing forward, thru singing and talking, the obsessive nature of scopophilic desire.
[8]

Katherine St Asaph: There’s Cascada-fied buzzes, space whooshes, powdered-sugar singing, and everything nice, but where’s the rush? Selena stomps through it when the lyrics suggest she should be dancing, and there’s no joy in her chorus. Probably because it’s mostly one note, one chord; at least “California Gurls” switched things up for “bikinis on top.”
[5]

Chuck Eddy: Probably more generic, and less Go-Go-rocking, than anything on her album, which could have yielded five more good singles if Hollywood had only let it. Penalized for corporate malfeasance.
[4]

Martin Skidmore: Crunchy synth-heavy pop-rock from one of the newer Disney alumni. The song is a little plain, but reasonably punchy, and Selena is very good. I wish the chorus were bigger, but it’s still a likeable single.
[7]

Jonathan Bogart: “Naturally” was a born-classic teenpop song, just a little more callow than was comfortable, with a full, dynamic setting for Gomez’ full, untrained vocals, with lots of grace notes and extra business to distract from her not-quite-ready-for-prime-time performance. But “Round and Round” is a more straightforward pop song, and she’s required to carry it herself, and she really can’t. I’d like to hear more from her once she’s settled into her skin, rid herself of the habit of choking off the beginnings of lines like she really means them, and learned how to ride a rhythm. In the meantime, we’ll always have “Naturally.”
[5]

John Seroff: Almost on first listen, “Round and Round” resounds with the clarion ping of the club striking the sweet spot. Barney’s good friend Selena is a limited instrument but she is used here to the height of her powers, disappearing into the track like a well placed effect. The melody is paint-by-numbers simple but the production is executed masterfully. Vocal and electronic trickery are used sparingly and gently; unlike so much radio flotsam, you are not so much buffeted as swept up. Like the best bubblegum, “Round and Round” retains flavor and snap far beyond expectations. Heartily recommended.
[8]

Hillary Brown: This is a smartly crafted nubbin of electro-pop, and while many of Radio Disney’s offerings fall into that category, this one is considerably sharper and better than most of them. Gomez’s vocals aren’t exactly great, but they are kind of interesting, and the tune would seem to have considerable appeal for spin class soundtracks alone.
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