Wednesday, April 29th, 2020

Powfu ft. beabadoobee – Death Bed

Some upbeat thoughts…


[Video]
[4.71]

Scott Mildenhall: A big idea, perhaps the biggest idea going, conveyed with an equivalent lack of imagination. Powfu expounds on death with lead rather than gravity, while the unwitting beabadoobee paints an almost absurdist picture of domesticity. All of this is elevated, though, by the rote effects applied to her sample. Reframed as a distant spectre of a 1950s American TV housewife, an unearthly tension arises between her and her purloiner. “Death Bed” works better than either would on their own.
[6]

Edward Okulicz: The impossibly sweet meets the drowsy. The sampled chorus from “Coffee” is so crucial to the song’s appeal, because just about everything good comes from there. It’s not that Powfu brings nothing, it’s just that the only bit of his I like is when he’s drawling along with beabadoobee on her own song. She’s likely made bank from this becoming a hit, so good for her.
[5]

Katherine St Asaph: I truly thought the 2020s were too irrevocably irony-poisoned to ever allow a Kimya Dawson revival. “Death Bed”: The Bed That Repeats.
[3]

Tobi Tella: It’s no surprise this went viral, being the exact intersection of chill pop and emo rap. The sung chorus is undeniably soft, no matter how macabre the context makes it. And while the lyrics often flirt with melodrama, I was taken by the amount of honest sentiment. The support toward an ex-partner and reckoning with one’s own mental health without falling completely into angst is honestly pretty impressive, and it’s nice to see a breakaway from the tropes of the genre.
[6]

Camille Nibungco: beabadoobee’s honeyed refrain salvages this ChilledCow lo-fi hop hop beat from what could easily have been another unmemorable SoundCloud emo rap song. The lyrics have apparently struck quite a chord with the TikTok community because of the darker undertones, but personally I find both the message and method overdone. 
[5]

Nortey Dowuona: I only chose this to shit on it. Then I read a bunch of the sad comments about this song helping them though the inevitable nature of death, and I thought, more people should be listening to Scarface.
[5]

Wayne Weizhen Zhang: The lyrical story is lachrymose and affecting, the vocal delivery from beabadoobee is effectively tender, and the accompanying Tik Tok is cutesy–but it’s still not enough to make up for Powfu’s meager rapping. 
[3]

Reader average: [5.66] (3 votes)

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