Tuesday, May 4th, 2021

EggPlantEgg – Oh Love, You Are Much Greater Than I Imagined

Checking in on Taiwan’s indie scene…


[Video]
[6.44]

Michael Hong: EggPlantEgg uses the same ’80s synthwave sound that’s captured so much of Asia’s attention to hint at something bigger to come from the beginning. It leaves you anticipating for so long until those shouts bring the chorus with them — perhaps no longer a surprise, but still a more than welcome shift — the synthwave packing nostalgia into the band’s romantic desires, the guitar line thrilling.
[7]

Samson Savill de Jong: This makes me nostalgic for a kind of music I wasn’t alive for and mostly don’t particularly care for in hindsight, which is an indicator that it’s well crafted at the very least, as well as being fun to listen to.
[6]

Katherine St Asaph: Does a lot of the same things as ABBA’s “I’m a Marionette“: heart-pounding tempo (in this case from love and not dissociation, but the effect’s the same); verses sung like they can’t quite hear the metronome over their anxious pulse; suddenly huge chorus rousing itself despite all context into massed vocals and major key; long gratuitous guitar interlude (with similar timbre, even). It’s always a good sign when a sentence begins with “does a lot of the same things as ABBA.”
[7]

Iain Mew: In the softly spotlit verse, they play with a hesitancy that almost folds in on itself. It turns out to be to set up a hat from which to pull strings of wild guitar solos, but just enough of a shudder remains to prevent it from just being a technical workout.
[6]

Juana Giaimo: I like the trembling vocals — especially when they get emotional in the chorus — so I find it really hard to see why they suddenly decided it was a good idea to add generic “ooh”s in every single section of the song that ruin all the tension. It’s still alright, but I can’t avoid thinking how much better it could be.
[6]

Alfred Soto: No way to paper over its solid construction: slow verse, adrenalized chorus sweetened with a unembarrassing guitar solo, momentum unflagging. And I’m a sucker for oh-oh-ohs. 
[7]

Tim de Reuse: I scoffed at the rushed “oh-oh-oh-oh-oh” over that wailing, crystal-clear guitar solo, thinking that it sounded like parody – then I thought, what is it parodying? What’s the exaggeration, here? Is it not just trying to be the loudest possible version of itself? While I still think this is too exhausting to listen to more than twice per day, its attitude is infectious, and I can’t hate anything with rhythm guitar this enthusiastic. Just look at him go!
[6]

Thomas Inskeep: The first verse simmers before the song explodes into a rocked-out disco fantasia — that guitar solo is like something Dan Hartman would’ve cooked up in ’79. Ends too suddenly, though.
[7]

Mark Sinker: Theme to a film from current inner-city Taiwan: When A Man Is in Love, a tale of passion in the trapped classes. The tousled young thug who collects debts for the gangs exploits but then falls for the bright gentle flower whose family owes money, the usual gnarls and bumps, misunderstandings, tragedies and confusions — creaky Quai de brumes material plotwise, really, though the video-camera seems keen to salt the requisite shabby darkness with a bit too much insta-grabby colour-glamour (till it feels now by feeling fake). I’m reviewing the trailer mainly because EggPlantEgg seem an odd fit for it all, nicely groomed slim hipsters from quite the wrong side of town, a long-standing former-student rock band delivering a song with tight keyboard-shaped structure, urgently breathy crisply handled singing and wailing melodic big-chorus guitar solos. It’s OK! But I then will probably never see this film! So who knows!?!
[6]

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